Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam to HBO!

Originally posted on BookPeople's Blog:

Get your popcorn ready. The Internet is buzzing and Darren Aronofsky (Noah, Black Swan) is going to be adapting, and possibly directing, Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy for HBO! We’re not going to name names, but book series seem to have found a home with HBO, and we’re not complaining one bit.

Also, if anyone wants to take another shot at adapting The Handmaid’s Tale to the screen, we are available for consultation on the project.

Check out the full report from Indiewire.


Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy is available on our shelves or via bookpeople.com

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Review: I Want to Show You More, by Jamie Quatro, Grove Press 2013, 206 pp.

Purchased / Reading With: The Starboard Sea by Amber Dermott, Summer Reading edition of Tin House

Type of Book: Loosely linked short stories / story cycle

My Research Interest: For entertainment

Structure: 15 stores of varying length, set around Lookout Mountain on the border of Georgia and Tennessee

Impression: I knew these stories would be “good” and “competent” short stories, because I trusted the recommendations. However, I was not prepared for the aching psychological depth of these stories. Quatro’s characters and narratives are not superficial, and anything but slight. This impression was solidified when the fourth story, “Here,” made me cry. I do not cry often when reading, yet this book made me tear up at least three times. Quatro demands the reader consider the mysteries, pains, and joys of parenting, marriage, illness, death, fear, and faith. The stories are intimate, visceral, and very much for today—but also timeless. The book is dark and light at once, challenging the reader to reconcile the two.

Readability: Everyone should read this book. This is one of those books that, if read with an open heart, will make the reader a better person.

Check out Roman Muradov’s cover for the new centennial edition of James Joyce’s Dubliners

Writing the Veteran Experience Summer Workshop, July 8, Dunwoody, 6-8

Originally posted on The Hooch: News & Events:

The Chattahoochee Review will hold a Summer workshop for new and returning “Writing the Veteran Experience” participants on GPC’s Dunwoody Campus, Tuesday, July 8, from 6-8 p.m., in room A 2110.

The free workshop is designed for participants to write about their own experiences of military service or to share stories of the impact on their lives of others’ service. Although the main participants in this session will include returning vets from our Spring session, the workshop welcomes participation from GPC students who are ASMs, OIF vets, and/or OEF vets. GPC alumni, faculty, staff, the general public, and members of student veteran organizations attending other colleges and universities are also welcome to attend.

Prior writing experience is not required; however, since returning participants will bring drafts or completed compositions to share with the group this session, new participants are encouraged to bring creative work as well. All GPC student compositions will receive consideration for inclusion in GPC’s award-winning student publications. Editor…

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Crossing Over (Into Comics)

Originally posted on The Book Wars:

Last week I did a couple of reviews of verse novels that worked pretty well as crossover (from YA to “adult”) fiction. This week I want to introduce two comics that suit the crossover theme, except this time when I say “crossover” I mean that I’m pretty sure these were marketed for older audiences but could have appreciative teen readers as well.

The first book, just like one of the books last week, was a gift from the lovely Megan Harrison. Daytripper by Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá was published in a serialized issues in 2010, and since then has won an Eisner award, a Harvey, and an Eagle award. The story is about Brás de Oliva Domingos …

The miracle child of a world-famous Brazilian writer, Brás spends his days penning other people’s obituaries and his nights dreaming of becoming a successful author himself—writing the end of other people’s stories, while his own…

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The Circle by Dave Eggers

Originally posted on A Little Blog of Books and Other Stuff:

The Circle After battling my way through ‘ The Luminaries ‘ by Eleanor Catton recently, I wanted to read something which was the absolute polar opposite of historical fiction and settled on ‘The Circle’ by Dave Eggers. It tells the story of Mae Holland, a twenty-something graduate who starts a new job at The Circle – a social media conglomerate the size and power of Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft and every other major tech company combined. Although Mae is impressed by what she finds there, the wider implications of how the company is developing soon become apparent.

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Oscar Wilde in Prison

Originally posted on A R T L▼R K:

51chT0vHKVLOn the 19th of May 1897, Irish writer Oscar Wilde was released from prison after serving a two year  sentence for criminal sodomy and “gross indecency”. He had to go through hard labor and major deprivation, a very problematic situation for a hedonist accustomed to his creature comforts. His experiences in prison were the basis for his last work, The Ballad of Reading Gaol(1898).

In a bid to understand the reasoning behind Wilde’s imprisonment, Neil McKenna’sThe Secret Life of Oscar Wilde (2003) systematically investigated all available evidence about Wilde’s amorous liaisons, his lifelong erotic attraction to men and his subsequent support of Uranianism. The latter was a 19th-century term which referred to the actions of a person of a third sex, neither entirely male, nor female, someone with “a female psyche in a male body” who is sexually attracted to men, later extended as a definition…

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On Virginia Woolf and Mrs Dalloway

Originally posted on Interesting Literature:

Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway was published on this day, 14 May, in 1925. In honour of this, we thought we’d offer a few little facts about this novel, and about Woolf herself.

The action of the book takes place over just one day – a ‘moment of June’ in 1923 – although there are flashbacks to events that occurred in the characters’ lives over the previous five years, in the immediate wake of WWI. The original title of the book was ‘The Hours’, a title that Michael Cunningham would go on to use for the title of his novel about Woolf, which weaves together events from Woolf’s own life and events from Mrs Dalloway. The book was filmed, in 2002, starring Meryl Streep and Nicole Kidman (the latter of whom famously wore a prosthetic nose to portray Woolf).

Woolf stampMrs Dalloway wasn’t the only novel Woolf wrote the action of…

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Katherine Anne Porter and Eudora Welty at Yaddo in 1941

Originally posted on Biblioklept:

Katherine-Anne-Porter-and-Eudora

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“To Any Reader” — Robert Louis Stevenson

Originally posted on Biblioklept:

wildsmith

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