Top Shelf in July: CALIFORNIA by Edan Lepucki

Originally posted on BookPeople's Blog:

california display

Y’all might recognize this month’s Top Shelf pick from The Colbert Report (and from recent posts right here on this very blog). California by Edan Lepucki is a debut post-apocalyptic novel coming out this month from Hachette Book Group, a publisher locked in a highly publicized struggle with an online retailer that has resulted in restricted access to Hachette’s titles. Stephen Colbert is having none of it and has used the power of his pulpit to not only champion California, but to also urge readers to purchase a copy from an independent bookstore and make this new post-apocalyptic novel a bestseller.

In the wake of Colbert’s support, and to show our own support for Edan, we shared Alex’s Top Shelf review of the book earlier in June. Here’s an excerpt:

“Lepucki manages to craft a rather low-key resolution that somehow feels more solid and pertinent than it could have in other hands. It…

View original 386 more words

Here’s to the ladies who punch …

Amber Nicole Brooks:

I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy of this book and review it along with the books I’ve already reviewed about *men* boxing–this is a much needed project. See Malissa Smith’s post below:

Originally posted on Girlboxing:

Here’s to the ladies who punch …

A History Of Women's Boxing

Today’s my big day.

The culmination of over two years of work on my new book, A History Of Women’s Boxing.

I get to strut my stuff in the ring at Gleason’s Gym and speak to an audience of assembled friends about the courage, bravery and pure gumption that women have shown for the past three hundred years each time they’ve donned the gloves. Oh yes, and smile a lot, sign books and jump around with glee!

It’ll be a moment to savor — though I admit to a plethora of doubts:  Did I get everything right? Did I forget someone? Did I make the point about pushing social and legal boundaries enough? Will the reader understand just how brave it was for a young and plucky Barbara Buttrick to insist that she had the right to box in 1949?

The historian’s lament…

View original 768 more words

Five Fascinating Facts about George Orwell’s 1984

Originally posted on Interesting Literature:

1. George Orwell’s classic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four was published on this day, 8 June, in 1949. But this wasn’t the original title of the novel. According to the introduction to the Penguin Classics edition, Orwell initially planned to set the novel in 1980; this then became 1982, and finally 1984 (or Nineteen Eighty-Four, as the title is usually rendered).

Orwell12. Orwell named Room 101 after a conference room in BBC Broadcasting House. In this room, during the Second World War, he had to sit through tedious meetings when he worked for the Ministry of Information. Indeed, the Ministry also served as the inspiration for the Ministry of Truth, where the novel’s protagonist, Winston Smith, works. ‘Room 101′ has, of course, entered wider linguistic use as a term for something containing one’s pet hates or worst fears. Although the novel also popularised the terms ‘thoughtcrime’ and ‘thought police’, these…

View original 242 more words

FLASH BOYS: The Unforgiving Hand of Truth

Originally posted on BookPeople's Blog:

flash boys
Flash Boys
by Michael Lewis

review by Andrew H.

Flash Boys, the latest from the ever prolific Michael Lewis, is a fantastic eye-opening account of the inherent corruption of the financial system. Not only the corruption, but Lewis exposes the fact that most bankers were too ignorant of the complex systems that ran the stock market to even realize what was happening. If you thought that after the Great Recession of 2009 the banks were forced to act more responsibly… this book will slap you in the face with the unforgiving hand of truth.

Luckily, the banks are run by humans, some of which have a moral compass and a sense of doing right by those whose interests they are supposed to protect. Flash Boys is their story. It’s common in populist rhetoric to believe the financial system is a well thought out machine, designed on purpose to…

View original 223 more words

William T. Vollmann’s Europe Central | A Short Riff on a Long Book

Originally posted on Biblioklept:

Kilian Eng

Kilian Eng

1. William T. Vollmann’s Europe Central,  811 pages in my Penguin trade paperback edition (including end notes), is a virtuoso attempt to describe or measure or assess or explain or analyze the Eastern front of WWII, a part of the war that in my American ignorance I know, or knew (no, know) so little about.

2. The book covers 1914-1975, most of the composer Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich’s life. If Europe Central has a hero, it is Shostakovich.

From the book’s last end note, “An Imaginary Love Triangle: Shostakovich, Karmen, Konstantinovaskya”:

When I think of Shostakovich, and when I listen to his music, I imagine a person consumed by fear and regret, a person who (like Kurt Gerstein) did what little he could to uphold the good—in this case, freedom of artistic creation, and the mitigation of other people’s emergencies. He became progressively more beaten down, and certainly experienced…

View original 870 more words

Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam to HBO!

Originally posted on BookPeople's Blog:

Get your popcorn ready. The Internet is buzzing and Darren Aronofsky (Noah, Black Swan) is going to be adapting, and possibly directing, Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy for HBO! We’re not going to name names, but book series seem to have found a home with HBO, and we’re not complaining one bit.

Also, if anyone wants to take another shot at adapting The Handmaid’s Tale to the screen, we are available for consultation on the project.

Check out the full report from Indiewire.


Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy is available on our shelves or via bookpeople.com

View original

Review: I Want to Show You More, by Jamie Quatro, Grove Press 2013, 206 pp.

Purchased / Reading With: The Starboard Sea by Amber Dermott, Summer Reading edition of Tin House

Type of Book: Loosely linked short stories / story cycle

My Research Interest: For entertainment

Structure: 15 stores of varying length, set around Lookout Mountain on the border of Georgia and Tennessee

Impression: I knew these stories would be “good” and “competent” short stories, because I trusted the recommendations. However, I was not prepared for the aching psychological depth of these stories. Quatro’s characters and narratives are not superficial, and anything but slight. This impression was solidified when the fourth story, “Here,” made me cry. I do not cry often when reading, yet this book made me tear up at least three times. Quatro demands the reader consider the mysteries, pains, and joys of parenting, marriage, illness, death, fear, and faith. The stories are intimate, visceral, and very much for today—but also timeless. The book is dark and light at once, challenging the reader to reconcile the two.

Readability: Everyone should read this book. This is one of those books that, if read with an open heart, will make the reader a better person.

Check out Roman Muradov’s cover for the new centennial edition of James Joyce’s Dubliners

Writing the Veteran Experience Summer Workshop, July 8, Dunwoody, 6-8

Originally posted on The Hooch: News & Events:

The Chattahoochee Review will hold a Summer workshop for new and returning “Writing the Veteran Experience” participants on GPC’s Dunwoody Campus, Tuesday, July 8, from 6-8 p.m., in room A 2110.

The free workshop is designed for participants to write about their own experiences of military service or to share stories of the impact on their lives of others’ service. Although the main participants in this session will include returning vets from our Spring session, the workshop welcomes participation from GPC students who are ASMs, OIF vets, and/or OEF vets. GPC alumni, faculty, staff, the general public, and members of student veteran organizations attending other colleges and universities are also welcome to attend.

Prior writing experience is not required; however, since returning participants will bring drafts or completed compositions to share with the group this session, new participants are encouraged to bring creative work as well. All GPC student compositions will receive consideration for inclusion in GPC’s award-winning student publications. Editor…

View original 11 more words

Crossing Over (Into Comics)

Originally posted on The Book Wars:

Last week I did a couple of reviews of verse novels that worked pretty well as crossover (from YA to “adult”) fiction. This week I want to introduce two comics that suit the crossover theme, except this time when I say “crossover” I mean that I’m pretty sure these were marketed for older audiences but could have appreciative teen readers as well.

The first book, just like one of the books last week, was a gift from the lovely Megan Harrison. Daytripper by Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá was published in a serialized issues in 2010, and since then has won an Eisner award, a Harvey, and an Eagle award. The story is about Brás de Oliva Domingos …

The miracle child of a world-famous Brazilian writer, Brás spends his days penning other people’s obituaries and his nights dreaming of becoming a successful author himself—writing the end of other people’s stories, while his own…

View original 701 more words

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 50 other followers

%d bloggers like this: